why did this dog throw up? is it even puke?

Hi!
So my friend has a Shitzu puppy who’s about 9 weeks old. We were carrying her from place to place with her zipped up in my vest. But suddenly, something warm, like mucus with little yellow dots came out of her. I think this is because we put her on some grass, and she nibbled for like 10 seconds. So then we thought it was nothing, and kept going to her house. After we got to her house, we put her in the carrying kennel to take her out again, on foot. Since the kennel wasn’t lined, it might have been hard for her to keep her balance. So I was carrying her, then I suddenly felt that the cage was wet again. Yep, it was that mucus substance. We cleaned her up, but right when she got home, she did it again.

So what is that liquid?
Could it be motion sickness?
Is it from the grass?

Any other tips?
She isn’t walking on a leash because she’s so tiny, and it would be difficult to get her to follow us, so until she gets a bit older, she’s gonna be carried.

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5 Responses to “why did this dog throw up? is it even puke?”

  1. Maureen M says:

    Why is this dog not walking on a leash?

  2. bob © says:

    it could be motion sickness or it could be something serious like parvo. if the vomiting continues she needs to see the vet.

    add- you could always get a harness for her..putting her on a leash will help greatly with house training and teaching her basic commands and teaching her to follow you.

  3. Kern Crowley says:

    Occasionally (I guess when he eats grass?) my lab will vomit this thick, pale green biley substance.
    I wouldn’t be worried.

  4. *doxie moxie* says:

    Its normal! Its just mucus, no need to worry.

  5. Michelle H says:

    It’s a little digestive fluid and mucus likely from eating the grass. Some dogs can chow on grass all day long and not get sick, but others throw up with a tiny bit. Your friend’s dog is really young and her stomach isn’t fully mature yet. She’s going to have a more sensitive tummy than an adult dog.